5 Years of the Legacy Project

5 Years of the Legacy Project

May 09, 2018

5 years ago on the 9th May 2013, this shot of the Ring of Brodgar on the Orkney Islands in Scotland heralded the beginning of The Legacy Project – A personal ten-year mission to photograph Stone Circles and other ancient sites scattered throughout the British Isles.

The project was conceived a couple of months previously during numerous 2am sessions trying to get my baby boy back to sleep. The reality is that the project was born out of prolonged sleep deprivation! My very roots as a landscape photographer were photographing the numerous Cumbria Stone Circles but years of working as a professional photographer had meant little time to shoot personal projects and Stone Circle Photography had become a distant dream.

I had always been interested in infrared photography but the reality was I never shot much of it because I never had a subject to focus on. With a number of the classic Infrared films being either discontinued or extremely hard to find, I decided that it was time to have a last fling with infrared film. But I needed a subject that would suit the infrared shots. Over a few weeks I considered a number of different possible themes for the fledgling project but something inside me kept bringing me back to the obvious.

The project needed a name. Stone Circles are a remarkable legacy of Neolithic Britain but the reality is that the majority of the general public can only name one stone circle – Stonehenge. This was something that I was keen to change. As I started to write down ideas for the project I quickly realised that this was perhaps my one chance to do something really worthwhile with my photography. A project that could perhaps stand the test of time just like the actual subjects have stood the test of the time. This was a combined legacy, not just of the stones but also of my own personal work. The Legacy Project was conceived.

The last five years have been incredible. Through various Kickstarter campaigns and the kind backing of supporters throughout the world, I have managed to visit more locations than I ever would have considered possible. So far there has only been one public exhibition but the venue happened to be the Joe Cornish Gallery and the exhibition was extremely well received. Who know where the project will go in the next five years but I do feel that there could be a final coffee-table style book on the horizon.

For now, I am going to leave you with my favourite ten images from the project. Click here if you would like to see all of the collection.